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Skate Tips: Frontside Coleman Slide

This is just a variation on the Coleman slide we all know and love. The only real differences are that you turn frontside (with your toes pointed in the direction you are turning), instead of backside, and you plant both hands instead of just one. Of course, this means that you need to have sliding gloves on both hands or in my case sliding pads. For me this is a lot easier to pull off and control than the standard Coleman slide. You might want to wear kneepads, when learning this one, because if the board goes out from under you, the first thing to hit is going to be your knees.

What you do is you head down the hill to build speed and do a hard low frontside turn. Plant both sliding gloved hands, and the board should break into a slide almost immediately. I find the slide comes so fast that before I know it I've done a 180 degree turn and can stand up and keep going down the hill switchstance. From there, it's a simple matter to kickturn back to regular stance before you get going fast and set up the next slide.

As I said, I find this way easier than a traditional (backside) Coleman slide. I think it's easier because you are supporting your weight on both hands, instead of one and counterbalancing with the other. If your balance is off on a regular Coleman slide, it's real easy to end up on your butt. Of course with a frontside Coleman slide, you might end up on your face, but so far that hasn't happened to me, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed. I can't wait to try it on the bank at the skatepark.

Postscript.     I did get a chance to try this at a skatepark, and it translates real well to bankriding.

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Nose Wheelie, except where noted otherwise, was written and created by Chris Sturhann.
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